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sagansense:

This is Frankenstein, MD. The show that’s overflowing with fascinating medical science facts…

So….this show is awesome and yet another brilliant PBS Digital Studios addition. Everyone, I encourage you to watch episodes 1, 2, 3, share them with your friends everyone, and make sure to follow vfrankmd on Tumblr, FrankensteinMD on Twitter,

,
"Like" the Facebook page for continuous updates, and peep the Instagram for more bite-sized frankenfun!

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Browse the archive here….

And lastly, here’s a preview (below and this link) of Frankenstein MD’s blog post introduction to the series and the first episode, which communicates the fascinating aspect of Galvanism or, “animal electricity”…muahahaha…

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Hi everyone. I’m very excited to release the first three episodes of Frankenstein, M.D., the web series that challenges assumptions and pushes boundaries in the fields of science and medicine. In our first experiment, my partner Iggy DeLacey and I explore the connection between electricity and the source of life itself.

And I’ve got all the “shocking” puns I need from Iggy, so don’t even start.

Visionary scientists throughout history have experimented with electrical power as a medical tool. One of my favorites is Italian physician Luigi Galvani, who demonstrated in 1786 that he could cause muscular contractions in a dissected frog’s leg by touching its nerve endings to a power source. His research led to an entire field being named after him (Galvanism) and laid the groundwork for the creation of the electrocardiogram, or EKG.

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The EKG, which Iggy and I use in our experiment, measures the heart’s electrical activity. The device has come a long way since Dutch physiologist Willem Einthoven invented it in 1895, a feat that won him the Nobel Prize. The early models took five people to operate and required the patient to immerse each of their limbs in a container of salt water. Fortunately, we can now measure the heart’s activity (or lack thereof) through electrodes placed on the skin.

Oh, and another term that you’ll need to know for this episode is premature ventricular contractions, or PVCs. They are extra, abnormal heartbeats that begin in one of your heart’s two lower pumping chambers (ventricles) and disrupt your regular heartbeat rhythm. They are very common and nothing to be concerned about – certainly not worth making foolish and potentially life-threatening decisions involving electrical equipment.

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Share and promote good science!

(Source: pemberleydigital-)

f0o0od:

avocado caprese salad

f0o0od:

avocado caprese salad

(via verticalfood)

sirredmayne:

one of my favorite things about the ice bucket challenge is that in this gif

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you see him spitting out a shit ton of water at the end because he’s so dumb and had his giant mouth wide open and got a giant mouth full of ice water

sugarskullsandglitterbones:

↑♡

sugarskullsandglitterbones:

↑♡

(via lilaclinewhitepage)

wtfevolution:

"I miss dinosaurs."
"Evolution, we’ve talked about this."
"But I miss them.”
"You turned them into birds, remember? It was the best you could do, given the circumstances.”
"It’s not the same."
"I know. I’m sorry."
"Can I at least make these cassowaries 50 feet tall?"
"Come on, you know that size didn’t work out so well before."
"Six feet, then? And over 100 pounds?"
"Yeah, that sounds better."
"And can I put weird prehistoric crests on their heads?"
"I don’t see why not."
"And can they slash people’s throats with their dagger claws?”
"Sure, pal, if that would make you feel better."
"I think it would. Thanks for understanding."
"You got it, evolution. Anytime."
Source: Wikimedia Commons / Bjørn Christian Tørrissen

wtfevolution:

"I miss dinosaurs."

"Evolution, we’ve talked about this."

"But I miss them.”

"You turned them into birds, remember? It was the best you could do, given the circumstances.”

"It’s not the same."

"I know. I’m sorry."

"Can I at least make these cassowaries 50 feet tall?"

"Come on, you know that size didn’t work out so well before."

"Six feet, then? And over 100 pounds?"

"Yeah, that sounds better."

"And can I put weird prehistoric crests on their heads?"

"I don’t see why not."

"And can they slash people’s throats with their dagger claws?”

"Sure, pal, if that would make you feel better."

"I think it would. Thanks for understanding."

"You got it, evolution. Anytime."

Source: Wikimedia Commons / Bjørn Christian Tørrissen

"Writing is the only trade I know of in which sniveling confessions of extreme incompetence are taken as credentials probative of powers to astound the multitude."

George V. Higgins (via vintageanchorbooks)

humansofnewyork:

"We don’t like pictures like this. It is not good to deduce an entire country to the image of a person reaching out for food. It is not good for people to see us like this, and it is not good for us to see ourselves like this. This gives us no dignity. We don’t want to be shown as a country of people waiting for someone to bring us food. Congo has an incredible amount of farmland. An incredible amount of resources. Yes, we have a lot of problems. But food is not what we are reaching for. We need investment. We need the means to develop ourselves." 
(Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)

humansofnewyork:

"We don’t like pictures like this. It is not good to deduce an entire country to the image of a person reaching out for food. It is not good for people to see us like this, and it is not good for us to see ourselves like this. This gives us no dignity. We don’t want to be shown as a country of people waiting for someone to bring us food. Congo has an incredible amount of farmland. An incredible amount of resources. Yes, we have a lot of problems. But food is not what we are reaching for. We need investment. We need the means to develop ourselves." 

(Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)

americaninfographic:

Bon Appétit

americaninfographic:

Bon Appétit

nycmugshots:

Robert Dalcour. Missouri State Penitentiary. May 29, 1917.
Convicted of First Degree Murder.

nycmugshots:

Robert Dalcour. Missouri State Penitentiary. May 29, 1917.

Convicted of First Degree Murder.

"American medicine is the best in the world when it comes to providing high-tech care. If you have an esoteric disease, you want to be in the United States. God forbid you have Ebola, our academic medical centers are second to none. But if you have run-of-the-mill chronic diseases like congestive heart failure or diabetes, the system is not designed to find you the best possible care. And that’s what has to change."

Dr. Sandeep Jauhar

Dr. Jauhar’s book is called Doctored: The Disillusionment of An American Physician

(via nprfreshair)